Our Racist Lens

Racism is not binary. It’s not something you wholly are or aren’t. It’s more like a sliding scale. Every human is racist to some degree, and we view the world through our racist lens. The clearer the lens, the less racist we are. The more distorted the lens, the more we show prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism against another person on the basis of their skin color or nationality. “How racist am I?” is the first question everybody needs to honestly answer. The second question is, “How judgemental am I of another person who is racist?

Well, we really are profoundly, deeply biased toward our own self-righteousness. This is why it takes continuous renewing of the heart and mind, or we slip into making ourselves the standard. We have to actively humble ourselves to resist the temptation to judge others. In fact, the most judgemental people are often the most racist. The Bible says, “Let any one who is without sin, be the first to throw a stone.” (John 8:7)

It’s not a matter of merely being humble because humility is not our default. It’s a mindset we have to cultivate. I’m a slow learner, but I think I finally understand it, thanks to becoming a student of God’s word. When Jesus tells me to love my neighbor and even to love my enemies, and to “do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you” (Luke 6:27–28), He’s doing me a favor. He knows if I assume the posture of a servant and humble myself, I will see reality more clearly. I will invest in others with value when I pour myself into them.

That’s literally what it means to bless someone, i.e. to add value to someone. I will regard them as more and more valuable as I actively serve them. Consequently, I will become less and less judgemental when I do because God will help me polish my distorted lens to become clearer and clearer.

I urge you to take action to cultivate humility in your heart and mind. It’s the only genuine way to battle racism to advance freedom, safety and opportunity for every single human being, with a focus on those in marginalized, underserved and underrepresented populations. That simply leads to a healthier, more innovative and more dynamic society that is servant-minded.

Published by Marc Casciani

Is your career a ministry? Visit Craft-Your-Calling.com to live up to the life which God called you.

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