A Differentially Tempered You

Differentially_tempered_sword
A differentially tempered sword. The center is tempered to a springy hardness while the edges are tempered slightly harder than a hammer.

In his 1940 book, The Problem of Pain, C. S. Lewis states:

Mental pain is less dramatic than physical pain, but it is more common and also more hard to bear. The frequent attempt to conceal mental pain increases the burden: it is easier to say ‘My tooth is aching’ than to say ‘My heart is broken’. Yet if the cause is accepted and faced, the conflict will strengthen and purify the character and in time the pain will usually pass. Sometimes, however, it persists and the effect is devastating; if the cause is not faced or not recognized, it produces the dreary state of the chronic neurotic. But some by heroism overcome even chronic mental pain. They often produce brilliant work and strengthen, harden, and sharpen their characters till they become like tempered steel.

220px-Tempering_colors_in_steel
The various colors of tempered steel indicate the temperature to which the steel was heated.

Lewis goes on to conclude that pain provides an opportunity for heroism and that the opportunity is seized with surprising frequency.

What’s the determining factor in the opportunity for heroism? One must accept and face the cause of the mental pain.

What are the consequences of not accepting and facing the cause of the pain? Fear, anxiety, depression, an obsessive–compulsive disorder or a personality disorder.

The problem with life is that people hurt people. We all will experience pain. Nobody is exempt. Therefore, we need to be prepared to deal with it. And mental pain is harder to bear than physical pain so it requires more energy and fortitude.

To become the best version of yourself, you need to choose to accept and face the cause of your mental pain. Nothing external to you controls you. Don’t avoid it. Take it head on by using The Fordriven™ Process. You don’t need to face it alone.

Choose to refine your character and become like differentially tempered steel. Let your heart be tempered to a springy hardness as it needs to have some give. Let your mind be tempered slightly harder, like the edges of a sword, as it needs to take the brunt of life’s blows.

Doing so will free you to produce heroic work.

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